New members of the Zadar County Tourist Board elected

first_imgRobertina Pustijanac Bunja and Jole Petričević were elected members of the Supervisory Board, while Goran Ražnjević, Tomislav Fain and Frane Skoblar are members of the Croatian National Tourist Board. ILIRIJA INVESTS HRK 35 MILLION IN RAISING THE QUALITY OF ITS ACCOMMODATION CAPACITIES AND NEW FACILITIES RESEARCH: THE SUN AND THE SEA ARE NO LONGER THE MAIN MOTIVE FOR THE ARRIVAL OF TOURISTS IN ZADAR AND ZADAR COUNTY At the session of the Zadar County Tourist Board, held on Thursday, February 21, 2019, new members of the Tourist Board, the Supervisory Board and representatives of the Zadar County Tourist Board were elected to the Croatian National Tourist Board.center_img RELATED NEWS: By unanimous decision for the members of the Tourist Board of the Zadar County Tourist Board were elected: Božidar Duka (regional director of D-marin Croatia), Tomislav Fain (director and board member of Terra travel agency), Valentino Gregov (caterer from the Zadar islands), Marin Kirin (member management and general manager of Falkensteiner hotel resort Borik), Marin Marasović (owner of hotel and tourist agency Rajna), Slavko Pernar (member of Povljana tourist board), Frane Skoblar (marketing manager of Tourist hotel Riviera Nin) and Goran Ražnjević (President of Ilirija dd, Biograd at sea ).last_img read more

Uniline took over the E-tours agency and strengthened its position in the corporate travel segment

first_imgUniline has offices in China and South Korea, as well as offices in Indonesia, Japan, Thailand and South America, and plans to expand to North America and India soon. Also, the big news is that the acquisition of the E-tours agency by Uniline took place, which further strengthened them in the segment of airline ticket sales and the organization of corporate travel. In 2019, Uniline, the leading destination management company in Croatia and the region of Southeast Europe, strengthened its business in all segments, opened new markets and initiated the development of new niche products. As Žgomba points out, the company sees great potential for emitting markets for Croatia and the region in the coming years in Australia and New Zealand.  With the opening of new markets, Uniline plans a stronger entry into various niche segments, such as health tourism, but also in the segment of support for the organization of various major events, which marked a successful step in cooperation with the leading gaming conference Reboot InfoGamer. “At Uniline, there is always an emphasis on the quality of the offer. We have proven to be a reliable partner to the world’s largest tour operators and smaller agencies in interesting emitting markets where we are building interest in Croatia and the region, and we are increasingly working to develop our own offer for the Croatian market in various segments, either independently or in cooperation . Uniline has a solid foundation for continued growth, both organic growth and the acquisition of complementary businesses. ”, said Boris Žgomba, President of the Management Board of Uniline. In addition, Uniline, as the holder of the SKIFUN franchise for Croatia, has significantly strengthened its offer of ski arrangements and will continue to develop its offer in this specific segment of tourist travel.last_img read more

Gasoline tax has its positive benefits

first_imgThe writer is correct that those with lower income feel more of the pain of the gas tax. This is more an issue of income inequality to be dealt with in that context via tax rebates for lower-income drivers, for example.The writer is also correct that in the short run, drivers often can’t change their driving habits in response to the tax. In the longer run, however, drivers buy more fuel-efficient cars, live closer to work and make fewer one-store trips.In short, no one likes to pay taxes, but sometimes they are necessary. The trick isn’t to get rid of the tax, but to make it work the way it’s supposed to.Lester HadsellTroyThe writer is a professor of economics at RPI.More from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationCuomo calls for clarity on administering vaccineEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionGasoline tax has its positive benefitsRe May 27 Viewpoint, “Slash state gas tax,” author Steve Keller argues that the tax on gasoline should be abolished. He contends that economists view higher gas taxes negatively and instead advocates to lower them. The consensus among economists is, in fact, that higher gasoline taxes are warranted — as much as three times the current level.The economic rationale for gasoline taxes is based on the concept of negative externalities: the harm to the environment and human health done by burning gasoline. A gasoline tax discourages use of gasoline, just as intended. The result of the tax is less consumption, less pollution, better health, less congestion and fewer accidents.The tax is more effective than alternatives; one study shows that gasoline taxes are multiple times less expensive than fuel economy standards at achieving increased environmental quality.last_img read more

Letters to the Editor for Tuesday, Oct. 22

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the census Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionProblems with Nisky Democrats’ robocallsOver the past few weeks I have received several robocalls from the Niskayuna Democratic Committee, asking for my vote.There are four problems. 1. I live in Glenville. 2. The caller ID says, ‘Lake Placid.’ 3. I sent an email some time ago, requesting that these mistakes be fixed, especially because hundreds if not thousands of calls to residents outside Niskayuna might be going out. Nothing was done and I received no response. 4. I tried to use the NDC’s website to contact them today. The email didn’t work.Dave DuncanGlenvilleGo after scofflaws to recover moneyIt would seem that the governor’s plan to raise $70 million from us New Yorkers has slowed down. The complete story is still to be written, I guess.I have been looking at the news and wondering if my license, that is due in April 2020, was going to cost me another $70 to replace my “perfect” plates.I was in Central Park recently and I walked up and down a row of cars. I observed that the greatest number of plates were perfect for another 10 years, except on one car that I noticed was wrecked more than the plate and should be replaced — the car, I mean.The main reason for this letter is that if the governor wants to raise some big bucks, for whatever purpose he has, he should have someone look into the scoffers that owe the state more than $70 million in fines that they have not paid on their violations of vehicle misuse. These scofflaws in New York state and Schenectady also should pay up or have their licenses taken away. Let’s collect from these law breakers and maybe reduced taxes.James A. WilsonSchenectadyDo test scores really indicate proficiency?The recent Scotia-Glenville school district newsy bits mailing included the overall assessment of student performance on the state standardized tests: 48 percent of students achieved level 3 or 4 (proficient) scores on the ELA (readin’ and writin’) test; 54 percent achieved proficient scores on the math (‘rithmetic) test.The first score was on par with last year. The second was six points better than last year.The numbers are consistent with a multiple-year check based on the district’s website report.The Scotia-Glenville school district, on its website, likes to buff its nails on this topic. And indeed, the scores are better than the Education Department’s (rather modest) expectations.On the other hand, if on average, student proficiency is about 50 percent across the board, that means that half the students are not proficient. Ooopsie.The story gets better. These students go on to high school, and most, around 95 percent, as I recall from the website report, seem to get the Regent’s Diploma.That is to say, youngsters who have notable problems with readin’, writin’ and ‘rithmetic miraculously (what else could it be?) manage in grades 9 through 12 to, um, remediate themselves.I find this all very puzzling.Donald JennerScotialast_img read more

Market rallies, but property disappoints

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Gordon the gaffer

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Tender-hearted

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Bristol surveyors agglomerate in Clifton

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Never underestimate the sleeping Japanese giant

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ECE looks for new bidders

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