Interview with Gen. José Burone, Deputy Head of the Uruguayan Defense General Staff

first_img In March, Diálogo magazine met with Gen. José Burone, deputy chief of the Uruguayan Defense General Staff, a body recently created in that South American country as part of the modernization of the Armed Forces. Among other posts, Gen. Burone has served as director of the Military Higher Education Institute (IMES) and as head of the Army General Staff, until being promoted to his current position. With this background, he spoke with Diálogo about the importance of the IMES, Uruguay’s contribution to peace-keeping operations, and the experiences they can share with other countries. Diálogo: What is the IMES? General Burone: The IMES is an institute whose abbreviation stands for the Military Higher Education Institute (Instituto Militar de Estudios Superiores). It has a long history in the professional education of the National Army’s officer corps. In 1928, the first General Staff course began, and in 1932, what is today known as the IMES was formally created. It is currently a university-level institute, and in particular, its fundamental mission is to offer mandatory training courses for officers who are being promoted to colonel and for those who are being promoted to the ranks of field-grade officers (majors), for training in command operations and leadership. The school also offers a General Staff course to train field-grade officers to serve as command advisors at different levels. In accordance with its regulations, the institute today includes the following schools: the School of Advanced Studies, intended for officers with the rank of colonel, and the Command and General Staff School, which offers the course for majors and for those who opt to do the General Staff course. For their part, the Army Language School, the Army Strategy School, and the School of Military Engineering are also part of the institute, each with a specific function. At the same time, a series of basic courses and other academic extension courses are offered, such as a course on the environment (see the course offerings), on different rationales for armed conflict, strategic intelligence, etc. All the courses are designed to meet the Army’s needs, but they also include the participation of civilians from different areas, from both the public and private sectors. In sum, the academic extension courses seek to link the civilian and military spheres in an academic environment. Diálogo: What is the duration of the courses? General Burone: The course for colonels has a duration of up to one year, according to the regulations in effect. Nevertheless, it’s currently extended by a semester, with the particular characteristic that at the end there’s a joint module in which officers from the other branches of the Armed Forces participate. The same thing happens with the General Staff course. Nevertheless, the latter has the particular characteristic that it is held in two phases. During the first year, all the officers who are being promoted to field-grade rank attend, and it’s mandatory. In the second year, the General Staff course is offered only for those who obtain a post there. Diálogo: Are foreign students accepted? General Burone: There are always foreign students, especially in the General Staff course. The participants who attend almost every year come from Argentina and Brazil. We’ve also had students from the United States, Paraguay, South Korea, etc. Beyond the knowledge that these courses can provide in academic terms, it’s very important to stress the interpersonal ties that are created in this environment. In the future, many of our students will occupy important posts in the Armed Forces and will facilitate relations among the institutions of their different countries. COURSE LIST: http://www.imes.edu.uy/cursos%202011 Diálogo: In addition to serving as director of the Military Higher Education Institute and as head of the Army General Staff, you are director of the National Peace Operations System. Consequently, and changing the subject, could you tell me why Uruguay has been so committed to peace-keeping operations? General Burone: Uruguay is on the list of the ten countries around the world that contribute the most troops to the United Nations and is one of the leading contributors in Latin America. In reality, participation translates into support for the Army and for the government’s foreign policy. There’s even a support mission that we’re carrying out that is not within the United Nations framework, and that’s the transportation and engineering group that we have in the Sinai Peninsula, which would fall under the Camp David accords signed between Egypt and Israel with U.S. sponsorship in September 1978. Our contingent has been in that region since 1982, and although it’s a peace mission that’s not under the United Nations flag, it represents what Uruguay’s foreign policy has been with regard to its contribution to world peace through its participation in missions of this kind. These missions began in 1928, with participation in the peace mission prior to the War of the Northern Chaco [between Paraguay and Bolivia, from 1933 to 1935]. The first peace mission developed by way of the first observer mission sent by Uruguay to Kashmir, in the region of Pakistan. From then on, the country continued collaborating with peace-keeping missions, which became more important with the Cambodian mission in 1992, when we participated with our first really large contingent, with battalions in a jungle area. For us, that was truly a challenge. Then came the mission to Mozambique, another to Angola, and today we have a presence in the Congo and Haiti. In that respect, I can affirm that Uruguay has had a presence in United Nations peace operations with significant contingents in a large part of the world. At present, the number of personnel carrying out this mission has become excessive with regard to the Army’s capacity to maintain this support. The original concept was to maintain one operational battalion constantly involved in peace-keeping operations. In 2010, going to Haiti was supported, and the time period for the mission in the Congo was extended starting in 2004. This represents a major effort on the part of the approximately 2,000 personnel we have deployed, and in addition to that, there are 2,500 who train three months ahead of time for everything having to do with the relief contingent. Without a doubt, this has a partial impact on carrying out the other missions of the Armed Forces and the Army, and the country’s domestic mission in particular. Diálogo: What are the peace-keeping experiences that Uruguay can share with other nations? General Burone: We have the Uruguayan National Peace Operations School (ENOPU). Courses are offered there in which we have foreign participants and in which the knowledge imparted has not been only theoretical, but also the instructors’ entire past experience. More recently, we’ve also participated in advising the Paraguayan Army on their deployment of a contingent of engineers to Haiti, and we’ve sent instructors to the Peace Operations School in Central America. In that respect, we’re always ready to offer our collaboration. How great that this entity exists, inside a military institute aimed at enhancement and preparation to provide military training for different levels and/or hierarchies, because in that way they become more professional in their army duties and also the absolute independence of the State or Governments – Armed Forces By Dialogo June 14, 2011last_img read more

Suriname and Brazil Strengthen Defense Cooperation

first_img Suriname and Brazil agreed to strengthen military cooperation and boost the former Dutch colony’s defense infrastructure, during a two-day visit to Paramaribo by Brazilian Defense Minister Celso Amorim. “Brazil and Suriname agreed to set up a working bilateral group that will address and coordinate defense activities for both countries at the high command level,” Amorim said at a news conference on September 13, together with his Surinamese counterpart, Lamuré Latour. The meeting between Amorim and Lamuré focused on joint cooperation in the Air Force, including education and training opportunities for Surinamese soldiers. The parties are going to define a formal exchange between soldiers and Brazilian experts. The parties also discussed the establishment of an airstrip on the border between the two countries and Suriname’s participation in the Amazon Monitoring System in Brazil. Caring for the biodiversity of the Amazon Rainforest and its rich water aquifers is important for Brazil, said Amorim. The Brazilian minister also spoke by telephone with Suriname President Dese Bouterse, and met with Foreign Minister Winston Lackin. Latour plans to travel to Brazil early next year to expand and strengthen the ties. By Dialogo September 17, 2012last_img read more

Brazilian Police Take Over Dangerous Rio Favela

first_imgBy Dialogo October 16, 2012 Brazilian Marines and paramilitary police stormed one of Rio’s most notorious shantytowns, as the city cleans up ahead of the 2014 World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games. It took just 20 minutes for the security forces to take over the Manguinhos slum in the pre-dawn raid involving hundreds of police assisted by helicopters hovering overhead, and armored personnel carriers carrying 170 marines that plowed through road obstacles set up in the narrow streets. No shots were fired, but three people were arrested. Police said that five alleged drug crime bosses that had fled to a nearby favela were killed on October 13. Police also increased their presence in Jacarezinho, a nearby favela and major crack cocaine consumption center. Some 1,300 heavily armed police members participated in the operations, officials said. The two favelas, home to some 70,000 people, are located 10 kilometers from downtown Rio and are strongholds of the powerful Comando Vermelho (CV) drug gang. The operation is “another step toward peace, to reduce the number of homicides, car theft, and home break-ins,” said Rio de Janeiro State Governor Sergio Cabral. “The practical effect of this is measured by a more peaceful life for citizens,” Cabral said. Rio de Janeiro’s Security Secretary Jose Mariano Beltrame, hailed what he called a “major victory for society, for the people, for public service.” Around midday, the police raised the Brazilian flag in the Manguinhos town square and sang the national anthem, symbolically freeing the shantytown from the crime bosses. What follows now is “a meticulous search for drugs, weapons and the arrest of criminals,” said Rio Military Police spokesman Federico Caldas. Paramilitary police will keep the peace until a unit with agents especially trained to handle favela affairs arrives in December, Caldas said. Hundreds of police officers blocked entrances to Jacarezinho, but did not occupy the site. “The Military Police needs more time to occupy this area. What we will do is have a constant presence there,” Deputy Civil Police Chief Fernando Veloso told TV Globo News.last_img read more

Costa Rican Coast Guard Chief Hails Effectiveness of Operation MARTILLO

first_imgDuring one successful Operation MARTILLO mission on April 29, law enforcement authorities, with the support of P-3 aircraft, interdicted a 30-foot, 250-horsepower go-fast boat which was carrying more than half a ton of cocaine. SNG personnel aboard three vessels deployed by Costa Rica’s police maritime security force intercepted the go-fast boat — which had no license number or name — off the Pacific coast, some 84 nautical miles southwest of the city of Quepos, one of the country’s major tourist resorts. There, SNG agents found 591 kilos of cocaine packed in 23 bags, and arrested the vessel’s three crew members, two Ecuadoreans and one Costa Rican national. Law enforcement authorities suspect the boat was from Ecuador. SNG agents interdict narco-boats The success of Operation MARTILLO The use of P-3 aircraft also enhances communications, he added, because “our vessels, our operators talk with the P3,” and the P3 communicates that information to authorities. During those efforts, military authorities in Operation MARTILLO remain on the lookout for new trends – such as the increasing number of Ecuadorean narco-ships in the region. These are typically small go-fast boats, which are difficult to spot. Most of them leave Ecuadorean port installations on the Pacific Ocean, go past that South American nation’s Galapagos Islands, and continue by Costa Rica’s Cocos Island. Drug traffickers often offload cocaine in Costa Rica for storage, and later attempt to ship the narcotics to Guatemala, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. Their boats, meanwhile, can be supported by as many as 21 other vessels providing logistical support, such as fuel and ammunition. The initiative has proven successful in interdicting drugs in the region, and a key component in that effort has been the use of Orion P3 patrol airplanes by U.S. Coast Guard personnel. These aircraft have sophisticated equipment that helps law enforcement officers detect and capture go-fast boats and fishing vessels that drug traffickers use to transport drugs, Col. Arias told Diálogo. The head of Costa Rica’s National Coast Guard Service (SNG), Colonel Martín Arias, is an enthusiastic supporter of Operation MARTILLO – a multinational initiative against drug trafficking along Central American coastal waters. SNG agents interdict narco-boats By Dialogo May 26, 2015 Such capabilities have helped law enforcement authorities achieve a high rate of success in stopping narco-boats that attempt to transport drugs from Ecuador and Colombia north to Honduras and Guatemala. Since Military authorities launched Operation MARTILLO in January 2012, the initiative has resulted in the seizure of about 400 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $8 billion. “If we, as countries, don’t coordinate … the winners are the drug traffickers,” Col. Arias said. “So, working in regional blocs, results are bigger, and we’re going to see more numerous results in the months to come, in the years to come.” “They’re Ecuadorean vessels, with Ecuadorean licenses, but usually operated by Colombians,” Col. Arias said. “It’s a mode we’ve been finding for almost a year.” During one successful Operation MARTILLO mission on April 29, law enforcement authorities, with the support of P-3 aircraft, interdicted a 30-foot, 250-horsepower go-fast boat which was carrying more than half a ton of cocaine. SNG personnel aboard three vessels deployed by Costa Rica’s police maritime security force intercepted the go-fast boat — which had no license number or name — off the Pacific coast, some 84 nautical miles southwest of the city of Quepos, one of the country’s major tourist resorts. There, SNG agents found 591 kilos of cocaine packed in 23 bags, and arrested the vessel’s three crew members, two Ecuadoreans and one Costa Rican national. Law enforcement authorities suspect the boat was from Ecuador. On the same day, agents on one of the SNG vessels also interdicted a nearby boat, the “Pura Vida,” with the support of personnel on another P-3 aircraft who spotted the suspicious boat. In addition to arresting the two crew members, the law enforcement officers found 24 fuel drums, a handgun, a GPS device, a satellite telephone, and two cell phones on the boat. The two countries have cooperated in the fight against drug trafficking for years. For example, in 1999, Costa Rica and the U.S. signed a joint patrol agreement calling for the Coast Guards of both countries to work together in Costa Rican and international waters in the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Such capabilities have helped law enforcement authorities achieve a high rate of success in stopping narco-boats that attempt to transport drugs from Ecuador and Colombia north to Honduras and Guatemala. Since Military authorities launched Operation MARTILLO in January 2012, the initiative has resulted in the seizure of about 400 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $8 billion. The importance of cooperation These are typically small go-fast boats, which are difficult to spot. Most of them leave Ecuadorean port installations on the Pacific Ocean, go past that South American nation’s Galapagos Islands, and continue by Costa Rica’s Cocos Island. Drug traffickers often offload cocaine in Costa Rica for storage, and later attempt to ship the narcotics to Guatemala, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. Their boats, meanwhile, can be supported by as many as 21 other vessels providing logistical support, such as fuel and ammunition. To combat sophisticated drug trafficking organizations, Costa Rica works in cooperation with various U.S. security forces, often through the former’s local Drug Enforcement Police and the Intelligence and National Security Bureau. Costa Rica also works closely with the security forces of neighboring countries, such as Colombia, Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras. During those efforts, military authorities in Operation MARTILLO remain on the lookout for new trends – such as the increasing number of Ecuadorean narco-ships in the region. “They’re Ecuadorean vessels, with Ecuadorean licenses, but usually operated by Colombians,” Col. Arias said. “It’s a mode we’ve been finding for almost a year.” The importance of cooperation The head of Costa Rica’s National Coast Guard Service (SNG), Colonel Martín Arias, is an enthusiastic supporter of Operation MARTILLO – a multinational initiative against drug trafficking along Central American coastal waters. To combat sophisticated drug trafficking organizations, Costa Rica works in cooperation with various U.S. security forces, often through the former’s local Drug Enforcement Police and the Intelligence and National Security Bureau. P3 patrol airplanes are crucial in Operation MARTILLO’s continuing efforts to fight such narco-trafficking. On the same day, agents on one of the SNG vessels also interdicted a nearby boat, the “Pura Vida,” with the support of personnel on another P-3 aircraft who spotted the suspicious boat. In addition to arresting the two crew members, the law enforcement officers found 24 fuel drums, a handgun, a GPS device, a satellite telephone, and two cell phones on the boat. The initiative has proven successful in interdicting drugs in the region, and a key component in that effort has been the use of Orion P3 patrol airplanes by U.S. Coast Guard personnel. These aircraft have sophisticated equipment that helps law enforcement officers detect and capture go-fast boats and fishing vessels that drug traffickers use to transport drugs, Col. Arias told Diálogo. Since January 1, the SNG has interdicted nine go-fast boats and three fishing boats, which were allegedly carrying more than 3.9 tons of cocaine; in total it has carried out 25 maritime interdictions, seizing more than 15.3 tons of cocaine, according to the Public Security Ministry. The use of P-3 aircraft also enhances communications, he added, because “our vessels, our operators talk with the P3,” and the P3 communicates that information to authorities. Since January 1, the SNG has interdicted nine go-fast boats and three fishing boats, which were allegedly carrying more than 3.9 tons of cocaine; in total it has carried out 25 maritime interdictions, seizing more than 15.3 tons of cocaine, according to the Public Security Ministry. The success of Operation MARTILLO P3 patrol airplanes are crucial in Operation MARTILLO’s continuing efforts to fight such narco-trafficking. “For an operation to be successful, really successful … support from the air –with the P3 airplanes – is extremely important, because the sea is vast, weather conditions – in general – are adverse, so it helps you intervene and reach targets more precisely,” Col. Arias said. “With a P3 plane, the probability of a vessel carrying narcotics, the possibility of capture, is 90 percent,” but “without a P3, it drops … to 10 percent.” The two countries have cooperated in the fight against drug trafficking for years. For example, in 1999, Costa Rica and the U.S. signed a joint patrol agreement calling for the Coast Guards of both countries to work together in Costa Rican and international waters in the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Authorities spot new trends on drug routes Costa Rica also works closely with the security forces of neighboring countries, such as Colombia, Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras. Authorities spot new trends on drug routes “For an operation to be successful, really successful … support from the air –with the P3 airplanes – is extremely important, because the sea is vast, weather conditions – in general – are adverse, so it helps you intervene and reach targets more precisely,” Col. Arias said. “With a P3 plane, the probability of a vessel carrying narcotics, the possibility of capture, is 90 percent,” but “without a P3, it drops … to 10 percent.” “If we, as countries, don’t coordinate … the winners are the drug traffickers,” Col. Arias said. “So, working in regional blocs, results are bigger, and we’re going to see more numerous results in the months to come, in the years to come.”last_img read more

Peruvian Service Members Train to Battle Dengue, Chikungunya

first_imgIt was the result of a cooperation agreement between the Ministry of Defense (MINDEF) and the National Institute of Health that has been operational since 2014 and is supported by the Health Directorate II – Lima South, as well as Regional Health Directorates for other parts of the country. The government plans on using the annual program to train 240 SMV Troops who are in the their second year of voluntary Military service; they can then join the regional government to work in community health. “There are many communities in Peru that are not well informed about public health,” Anderson said. “It is important for service members – through these trainings – to help civilian society to learn what the risks and causes are if they discover a person is infected.” Those graduates will ”assist in risk and damage prevention actions in their communities, particularly in cases of high incidence outbreaks like dengue and chikungunya, as well as activities to promote health and disease prevention,” according to the INS, which, along with the Health Directorate (DIRESA) of Piura, coordinated the classes for SMV Troops at Military bases in Callao, Lima and Ucayali. Protecting the civilian population To ameliorate the situation, the First Artillery Brigade is manufacturing about 100,000 ABATE pumps to protect civilians from dengue, chikungunya and malaria by eradicating mosquito larvae, preventing the disease from spreading. Meanwhile, the Armed Forces is also helping combat the disease in thousands of homes; 40 Peruvian service members from the First Cavalry Brigade, in coordination with the regional DIRESA in Piura, provided support for abatement at more than 1,800 homes in the town of Santa Teresita and in the district of Bellavista on June 26. And six days earlier, the Military, working with health agencies, fumigated all the facilities at the Inclán Barracks as a precaution. INS Chief Ernesto Gozzer Infante led the graduation ceremony, which was also attended by Brigadier General José Rispigliosi, Chief of Staff for the Army First Division. The 400 hours of training will help young service members between the ages of 18-25 aid those suffering from the deadly fevers; those who completed the course at the Miguel Grau Military Barracks in Piura are considered “public health technicians, and are now ready to join Health Brigades under the Regional Health Directorates,” Peru’s Army reported in a statement. Peru’s Ministry of Defense workers and 41 Voluntary Military Service (SMV) members recently completed classes offered by the National Institute of Health (INS) to combat dengue and chikungunya. center_img Medical professionals trained the first group of SMV Troops from July 14 – November 20, 2014 — 85 young Soldiers who were assigned to Military Fort Alfredo Vargas Guerra in Iquitos, with Troops from the Army’s First Brigade Special Forces in Chorrillos and the Callao Naval Base also participating in the public safety course. Since then, starting in January, 114 SMV Soldiers at the Voluntary Military Service contingents based at Pucallpa Naval Base, the Army General Barracks (Pentagonito) and the Naval Medical Center have received training. The instruction’s also saving lives in a dangerous situation. In mid-July, health authorities reported 32 cases of endemic transmission of chikungunya — 31 in the northwest region of Tumbes and one in Piura, which neighbors Tumbes — according to Sin Embargo. And on July 18, authorities extended a state of health emergency for 90 days in the province of Piura after 22 people died from dengue and the first endemic cases of chikungunya fever were detected. The health emergency remains in place in the regions of Tumbes and La Libertad. By Dialogo July 30, 2015 I am elderly. Do you think I can get the course to help my siblings and/or others who need it. I lived in Lima? It is very good and important to give instruction on his knowledge to those who are farthest from the city. I think it’s excellent to prepare boys with any kind of activity geared toward their future and the good of the country. Of course you can take the class to help your relatives. Do it. This training effort is beneficial, since every sector should be ready to prevent illnesses in the communities and this way we will improve the populations’ quality of life. It is a worthwhile humanitarian effort in the country; it should be replicated on a national level to fight different diseases. We would like to thank you for sending us interesting articles. We would also like to have the audio files to use them on our radio stations.. Promoting public health “All of this instruction is an important pillar for the youth in voluntary military service,” said César Ortiz Anderson, president of Peru’s Pro Citizen Safety Association (APROSEC). “They have the option of continuing a career in the Armed Forces, and for many young people it’s valuable to be a representative of the Peruvian Army, Navy or Air Force.” The training focused on “promoting health, the foundations of public health, vigilance over water quality, surveilling and controlling vectors, food conservation, oversight for solid waste, oversight prevention and the control over select multi-environment zoonotic diseases,” Peru’s Navy reported. last_img read more

Brazilian Army Modernizes its Armored Vehicle Fleet with Guarani Project

first_imgBrazil’s Army is expanding its fleet of vehicles as part of Project Guarani, a key initiative that aims to modernize them for the Cavalry and Mechanized Infantry Divisions. The Military launched the project after determining it needed to modernize its fleet of armored vehicles — an analysis that began in 1999 with the investigation of basic operational requirements to replace Brazil’s 30-year-old fleet of Urutu and Cascavel armored vehicles. “Project Guarani is the primary initiative of the Brazilian Army,” Colonel José Henrique de Cássio Ruffo said during a presentation at the 4th annual Latin America Armored Vehicles conference in Bogotá, Colombia, on July 1. “We will be finishing it 20 years from now.” By the end of 2015, the Brazilian Army will choose a developer for the 4×4 VBMT-LR (Armored Multitask Vehicle – Light Vehicle Class), which, just like the 6×6, will be built and produced in Brazil. The Military will order at least 186 vehicles of this kind, Major Cardoso Brites said. A similar plan for about 13 Guarani 8x8s is also in the works. The 4×4 and 8×8 Guarani armored vehicles are designed to complement and expand the Army’s operational capacities. Extensive testing By Dialogo July 24, 2015 It was with interest that i read the article. According to another source an alternative will be employed as weapon on the vehicle that is promoted as an “alternative to Remote Control Weapon Stations”.It would be of interest to see this system that will act as alternative as the newest drive / tendency is to develop a more cost effective Remote Control Weapon Station complementing the price of a vehicle. Thus from our company perspective we are launching a new range of Remote Control Weapon Station (especially in the 12.7mm and 20mm class weapon) termed Rogue LITE. In conclusion it really would be interesting to compare performance and price of such a remote control weapon system vs this new system. That decision follows the testing of over 300 operational and technical requirements in Italy, Germany and Brazil; at the request of the Armed Forces, manufacturers in those countries evaluated the vehicles for their amphibious capabilities, maneuverability in different kinds of terrain, mileage capabilities (kilometers per gallon) and fire hazard systems. The Brazilian Military also deployed the Guarani in Rio’s favelas for pacification purposes; in Mato Grosso do Sul for border protection; and in Paraná, where the 15th Motorized Infantry Battalion uses them for peacekeeping missions and to fight organized crime. Since then, Iveco has begun delivery of the vehicles: 86 VBTP-MRs 6×6 Guarani armored vehicles in December 2012, and an additional 102 6×6 vehicles as of June 2015. Each is designed to transport 11 passengers using a Brazilian-made 383- horsepower Iveco Diesel Engine with six-speed automatic transmission and independent hydro pneumatic suspension in each wheel. The VBTP-MR has a modular design capable of utilizing a variety of weapons systems, ranging from manual and automated turrets for close protection to the REMAX (Reparo de Metralhadora automatizada X) remote weapon system, a flexible component that can be adapted for 7.62x51mm NATO cartridges, .50 Browning machine gun cartridges or grenade launchers. Production begins For that purpose, Brazil is seeking and developing various kinds of weapon systems, including anti-tank laser-guided missiles for the 4×4, and 105mm self-propelled howitzers for the destruction of high-value targets for the 8×8. The Army is also preparing ambulance, command post, fire direction, mortar carrier and repair and recovery variants for the Guarani family. “With the Guarani, the mechanized infantry can maneuver faster and with more depth,” Colonel Ruffo said. “They can combat with a high degree of security, and with firepower that can respond to all threats.” Through Project Guarani, the Army will build at least seven types of armored vehicles, including several variants of 6×6, 4×4 and 8×8 vehicles, according to Colonel Henrique Ruffo, the initiative’s Project Manager. After the tests, the Brazilian government in December 2009 signed a $3.4 billion, 20-year deal with Iveco to develop and produce 2,044 VBTP-MRs (Armored Personnel Transport Vehicle – Guarani Midsize Vehicle Class) in Brazil. More than 100 Brazilian suppliers have been directly involved in the effort. last_img read more

Costa Rica Establishes National Police Academy

first_imgBy Julieta Pelcastre/Diálogo October 31, 2018 Costa Rica passed a law in June 2018 to transform the National Police School into the Francisco José Orlich Bolmarcich National Police Academy to train national Public Security forces with a special emphasis on human rights. Four processes characterize its educational development: instruction, training, specialization, and research. “The transformation entails strengthening what already existed,” Public Force Commander Guillermo Valenciano, academic chief of the Costa Rican National Police Academy, told Diálogo. “Now [the law] brings forth the character of the new police institution as the country’s leading organization for police education.” Thanks to international cooperation agreements, the academy carries on with U.S. strategic cooperation in the police training of Costa Rican Public Force officers. Costa Rica and the United States are long-term strategic partners in a variety of academic and security activities. “We are developing academic process rules, improving our curriculum, adapting it to the real world, and [taking] a quantitative and qualitative leap in these processes,” Public Force Commissioner Eric Lacayo Rojas, director of the Costa Rican National Police Academy, told Diálogo. “Our projection is for six months [December 2018] to create the rules.” Comm. Lacayo said the curriculum would be based on a democratic, civil approach with respect to the guarantees, norms, and defense of human rights. Plans also include preventive security endorsed by the Costa Rican Ministry of Public Education. Collaboration between the Costa Rican and U.S. governments improved conditions of the academy’s Murciélago Police Training Center, with refurbished shooting ranges, the purchase of equipment, and a new instructor lounge and armory. Improvements resulted in increased capabilities for specialized academic courses. “Thanks to security cooperation, we exchange and build knowledge through instruction and training in different areas, not only with the U.S. government, but also with the Colombian National Police, each from their own experience,” Comm. Lacayo said. “Everything plays a part for better prepared security forces to fulfill their missions and confront current criminal threats. We try to anticipate criminal actions through instruction processes.” The academy’s comprehensive work will favor the creation of agreements and accords with public and private institutions and universities at the national and international level, linked to police training, instruction, and specialization; instructor and expert exchanges; and joint program development. The institution will also offer a range of security services to public and private entities. It will authorize and supervise public and private agencies that teach private security courses required by law. Investigation for security The police academy promotes academic research on citizen security and public order, among its other functions. “To establish research as an academic tool is like practicing lessons learned based on research,” Cmdr. Valenciano said. “Security forces work separately and don’t have the same procedures,” Comm. Lacayo added. “The academy will standardize policies and procedures to improve the training of security institutions in the country.”​​​​​​​ Steady flow of revisions The Costa Rican Public Force prepares and trains nonstop to prevent crimes, reduce crime rates, and increase the security of the population. “It’s important to keep the force up to date to maintain skills and capabilities in top shape and fulfill duties efficiently and successfully,” Comm. Lacayo said. The United States supports Costa Rican police officers with training and instruction, and assists the Ministry of Public Security through information exchange and strategic equipment donations to strengthen response capabilities of the Central American country’s security forces in land, sea, and air surveillance. In recent years, the United States assisted Costa Rica with riverine and interceptor patrol vessels, cargo aircraft and helicopters; armored vehicles; computing equipment; and virtual shooting ranges. “We count on a large umbrella to guarantee instruction processes. Integrating police training in our country is a priority for the Costa Rican government and Ministry of Public Security,” Comm. Lacayo concluded.last_img read more

JTF-Bravo Brings 10,900 kg of Food and Carries Out 15 Rescues in Panama

first_imgBy Roberto López Dubois/Dialogo November 12, 2020 Members of U.S. Southern Command’s Joint Task Force Bravo (JTF-Bravo) continue rescue efforts, humanitarian support, and transportation of health care personnel in areas of Panama affected by flood and mudslides due to Hurricane Eta.As of November 11, the JTF-Bravo team has carried out some 15 rescues of people who were trapped in dangerous areas due to flooding. The U.S. mission in Panama has also transported about 10,900 kilograms of food as well as water to communities in Chriquí province and the Comarca Ngabe-Buglé, which were without supplies for a few days following the hurricane.Members of JTF-Bravo partnered with the Panamanian National Civil Protection System to deliver live-saving and urgent supplies of water and 4,535 kg of food to a community in Panama that was left isolated for 96 hours following the effects of Hurricane Eta, November 7, 2020. (Photo: U.S. Air Force Captain Rachel Salpietra)In addition, JTF-Bravo conducted reconnaissance flights with its helicopters to determine the damage to roads and infrastructure, and has evacuated people isolated by floods and landslides, and transported the bodies of victims from areas without land access.“Thanks to the tireless work of our government team, the solidarity of the Panamanians and the Joint Task Force team, medical supplies, medicine, bags of food and utensils continue to arrive to the affected communities in Bocas del Toro and Chiriquí,” said Panamanian President Laurentino Cortizo on Twitter.Among the rescues made, the JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Office highlighted that of a 70 year-old man and his dog who were found weak due to lack of food and water. “We were told that he walked for seven days with his dog from the province of Bocas [del Toro] to Chiriquís. He apparently lost his horse along the way due to landslides,” JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Office shared with Diálogo.According to U.S. Navy Captain Matthew Turner, senior Defense cooperation officer in Panama, some HH-60 Black Hawk helicopters were already in Panama in preparation for an operation scheduled for January 2021 with the Ministry of Public Security, which allowed for immediate support to the affected areas.“Working together, we have been able to rescue several people from hard to reach places, as well as [transport] more than 40,000 pounds [18,144 kg] of humanitarian aid, water, food, medicine to people in rural areas; we have had a very close collaboration, and we are happy to be able to help Panama,” said Capt. Turner.JTF-Bravo Public Affairs Office said that as of the morning of November 11, the force had rescued 118 people throughout Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama and delivered 81,193 pounds of life-saving supplies.last_img read more

Briefs

first_imgBriefs Committee appointment process complete June 1, 2003 Regular Newscenter_img The new system of using only electronic applications to apply for Bar committee appointments worked beautifully this year, according to President-elect Miles McGrane, who recently completed the task of appointing some 500 lawyers to the Bar’s substantive law and standing committees.McGrane also said now that term limits for committee participation have been in place for two years, more opportunities than ever were available for members to become involved in the important work of the committees.For the first time the annual committee preference form was only available on The Florida Bar’s Web site this year. Members had the ability to fill out the form and submit it on-line, eliminating the need to insert the form in the Bar News and requiring members to mail or fax in the completed form. It also was presented in the same format as usual and only took a minute or two to complete and submit on-line.“The move to an electronic committee preference form saved the Bar over $10,000,” McGrane said, adding that officers of the Bar have a fiduciary duty to look for ways to conserve the Bar’s resources.McGrane said he worked to appoint people to the committees who had not previously had an opportunity to serve and in making the appointments considered previous history of service to the Bar and service to local voluntary bar organizations.Although a smaller number of members may not have been successful this year, McGrane apologized to those he was unable to appoint, but said their applications would remain on file to fill interim appointments if vacancies occur.He also encouraged those who did not get appointed to apply again when the committee appoint process begins anew in December. One way to enhance your success of being appointed is to list three choices on the form and provide comments about yourself that might set you apart from other applicants, McGrane said.“As a mandatory Bar, we are charged with the obligation of maintaining and improving our justice system,” he said. “Our Supreme Court relies heavily upon us and our expertise in the exercise of the court’s rule-making authority. Additionally, through our substantive law committees, we constantly strive to improve those areas of law.”last_img read more

Legal Roundup:

first_imgLegal Roundup: April 15, 2005 Regular News Legal Roundup: Volusia County Bar Awards Grant: A Central Florida public high school that attracts students interested in becoming lawyers has received a grant from a branch of the Volusia County Bar Association. Atlantic High School, located in Port Orange, is the home of the Academy of Law and Government. The academy is known as a kind of school-within-a-school that offers student programs with career based themes. The high school received $2,000 to fund a scholarship for a graduating academy student. The donation can also help the academy defray the cost of sending a group of students to Tallahassee for Student Government Days. “There is a natural tie between the Volusia Bar Foundation and the academy that trains future members of the legal community,” said Belle Schumann, president of the Volusia County Bar. “This is the beginning of a strong relationship.” Freeman to Lead Seminole Bar Legal Aid: The Seminole County Bar Association Legal Aid Society, Inc., recently elected Thomas Freeman as it new president. Other officers and board members include Ned Julian, vice president; Melvin Rogers, treasurer/secretary; and directors Dr. Larry Chu, Lonnie N. Groot, James Hart, Carol Hawkins, Susan Stacy, and Seminole County Bar Representative Richard A. Colegrove.The society also honored a number of lawyers for their pro bono service, including Ned N. Julian, Jr., George Perez, Kathy S. Cook, Amy Hamlin, William H. Morrison, Susan Williams, and William Fernandez. Edgecomb Bar Sets Law Week Banquet: The George Edgecomb Bar Association will celebrate its 22nd anniversary at its Annual Law Week Banquet April 25 at the Hyatt Regency in downtown Tampa by recognizing high school students who have exhibited excellence in academics. Walter Fauntroy, who served 10 terms as the District of Columbia’s delegate in the U.S. House of Representatives, will be the keynote speaker. In 1981, as chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, he launched both the first Constructive Budget of the Caucus and the National Black Leadership Roundtable, which served as the CBC’s national network vehicle. The bar also will present its Francisco Rodriguez Award to Rev. Abraham “Abe” Brown, who founded a prison ministry. Tickets and table sponsorships can be obtained by calling Kamilah Perry at (813) 229-4324 or Kemi Oguntebi, (813) 254-8717. People’s Law School Promoted: The Florida Bar Foundation recently provided a $5,000 grant to be used for advertising the Clearwater Bar Association’s People’s Law School in the St. Pete Times. The Clearwater Bar’s 15th People’s Law School kicked off in January Clearwater Main Library. Prather to Lead Trial Lawyers: David C. Prather was recently sworn in as president of the Palm Beach County Trial Lawyers Association. Elected to the executive board were President-elect Walter “Casey” Jones IV, Treasurer Richard M. Benrubi, and Secretary Harry Shevin. Rafael Roca will serve as immediate past president. Also installed for two-year terms on the board were Eric Romano, Mickey Smith, and Jonathan Levy. They will join fellow board members John Carroll, Fred Cunningham, Lance Ivey, and Joe Landy who are serving the remainder of their terms. Collier Young Lawyers Aid Kids: The Young Lawyers Section of the Collier County Bar recently hosted more than 120 children from the Family Preservation Services of Florida and the Children’s Network of Southwest Florida at the Zoo at Caribbean Gardens. In what has become an annual event, The YLS provided lunches, a free day at the zoo, and a toy or gift to children in foster care or receiving services from Family Preservation Services. “We are so pleased to see the tremendous support from the local legal community for our holidays event every year.. . and the smiles that we receive in return make it all worthwhile,” said John C. Clough, YLS president. Attorney volunteers included Sonia Bretzmann, Maggie McMorrow, John T. Cardillo, Jr., John C. Clough, Rebecca Zung Clough, Damian C. Taylor, Scott Rowland, Rebecca M. Hodge, Richard Weldon, Mike Mummert, and John Scuderi. Other volunteers were John Diaz, Miriam S. Montalvo, and Jennifer Weldon. Calling All Golfers: The staff of Page, Eichenblatt, Bernbaum & Bennett is helping to raise money for Easter Seals Camp Challenge. The annual Barrister’s Cup golf tournament is set for April 21 at Alaqua Lakes Golf Club in Lake Mary. If golf if your game, there are still spots open at $150 per golfer. Contact the firm at (407) 386-1900 for more information. Florida Coastal Renames Center: Florida Coastal School of Law’s Center for Strategic Governance and International Initiatives has changed its name to the Center for Law and Public Policy. The center will continue to be a resource for responding to challenges of economic development, law, public policy, internationalization, and market competition. The center has been recognized for identifying the diverse needs of the Southeast, by providing expert information on political and economic issues, facilitating international networking, interacting with government on matters of public policy, and promoting cultural diversity. Lawyers and Basketball: Legal Professionals Night with the Orlando Magic is set for April 18 at the TD Waterhouse Centre. Those who work in the profession can get discounts on tickets to see the Magic play the Indiana Pacers and there will be an Exclusive Suite Level Terrace Reception beginning at 5:30 p.m. Tip-off is at 7 p.m. For ticket information call (407) 89-MAGIC, and press “1” at prompt.last_img read more