Irish giving patterns revealed

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Ireland Research / statistics Irish people are expected to give 450 million euro to charity this year, according to a new wide ranging study on charitable giving in Ireland. The study, Good Intentions: Consumer Preferences for Charities in Ireland, was undertaken by research body Amarach Consulting.Michael McLoughlin, Amarach managing director, said this giving level was not particularly generous when compared with other wealthy nations, although he conceded that it was difficult to make direct comparsions given the different tax, cultural and other differences between countries. The study found that nine out of ten people donated to one or more charities during the year with the average donation 15 euro a month. Just 12 per cent, however, make fixed monthly donations according to the survey. Older adults (aged 55-64) and high income earners were more likely to make these regular donations. Advertisement Howard Lake | 10 July 2005 | News  28 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Some 26 per cent of Irish people, mostly in the older age bracket, preferred to donate to health related charities, with 21 per cent, in the younger category, opting for children´s charities. The study draws the conclusion that health related charities would fare better in the future as our population aged, while children´s charities would not do so well.Some 15 per cent of donors preferred Third World charities, with higher income groups more likely to support this cause. The research also found that Dubliners accounted for 40 per cent of all charitable donations, despite accounting for 29 per cent of the population. Some charities were failing to make use of the tax incentives available with 25 million euro being lost because they were not claiming back tax from regular donors who were paying through the PAYE system. Irish giving patterns revealed About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Rangers Foundation announces three new charity partners

first_img Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 4 August 2005 | News Guide Dogs, The National Deaf Children’s Society and the British Heart Foundation are all set to benefit from a year-long association with The Rangers Charity Foundation following their unveiling today (Friday, 5 August 2005) as the Foundation’s nominated charities for season 05/06.In addition to a cash donation at the end of the season, the Foundation will assist each charity with fundraising and press and publicity via in-kind donations, player appearances, tickets, can collections and signed items. Rangers Foundation announces three new charity partnerscenter_img Advertisement  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Marketers now spend more on retaining than acquiring customers

first_img Howard Lake | 17 May 2006 | News Perhaps, at last, both clients and agencies have come to appreciate the Bain & Co theory that by increasing retention by as little as five per cent profits can increase by as much as ninety five per cent.One only need look at some of the most recent influential advertising campaigns to understand the change in emphasis. The award winning VCCP campaign for O2 is all about highlighting the benefits of remaining a customer whilst the amusing Nationwide campaign is equally targeted at existing customers. And charities, too, are beginning to cotton onto the marketing technique. Stephen Maher, of MBA, Marie Curie’s communications agency says: “Much of the advertising work we do is to help support the charity’s marketing to its current donors, be it to try and upgrade the level of donations or create a legacy.” Tony Clarke, global director of ICLP, the specialist loyalty agency believes that companies, and this includes charities, need to understand better their customers’ behavioural buying patterns and what makes them tick and then respond to them in a personalised and evocative manner. Indeed, we at Teamspirit are seeing a much more significant proportion of the marketing budget going towards communicating with existing customers and giving them the rationale to stay with their original supplier and service provider.So the retention of customers is becoming increasingly important. For the old leaky bucket model of topping up with new customers to replace lost ones is no longer commercially viable. Media is so fragmented that is it becoming prohibitively expensive to target audiences and the competition in the market place has become fiercer. Charities are being forced to redress the balance by marketing more positively to their current customers.Paul Canal, managing director of Charity People concurs and says: “We are certainly placing a greater marketing and sales emphasis on ensuring customer loyalty. It is all about adding value.”Ascertaining the most profitable current and future customers has for a long time been the holy grail. However, with the better harvesting and understanding of customer data it now seems within grasp and thus the ability to communicate to customers in a more personalised way. Clarke of ICLP says: “The 80:20 rule has long been bandied about like confetti at a wedding. But it is now possible to find who your 20% of customers are that deliver 80% of your profit.”To date too many companies have relied on trying to bring in new customers at the expense of looking after their existing ones. For as long as there has been the ability to put on new customers relatively cheaply many charities did not have to tackle the tougher questions of how to keep existing donors happy. CHASE regularly mails their existing donors, encouraging them to increase their regular gift or just reminding them of the wonderful work that they do. However, the charity recognises that it also has to replenish its donor base and occasionally runs direct mail campaigns to a pre-designated, albeit cold, target audience.However, marketing budget realignment will only reap the desired rewards if charities are serious about taking an holistic approach to the whole area of retaining donors. And many practices fail to appreciate the importance of customer service in deepening loyalty. The consumer will stay loyal, but only when the suppliers provide an integrated platform of offerings and service that reflects the projected brand image. To stem the tide companies need to spend more of their budget retaining consumers by developing programmes that produce real insight into behaviour and buying patterns and thus allow for better customer service and reward programmes.So whilst we applaud the change in emphasis away from chasing one’s tail and constantly trying to acquire new donors – historically to the detriment of existing ones – there is still a long way to go before charities can claim to understand and appreciate loyalty. But, at last, they are trying.Jo Parker is Managing Director of Teamspirit. Jo Parker, Managing Director of Teamspirit, tells UK Fundraising that this is the year of the consumer, as marketers for the first time spend more overall on retaining customers rather than on acquiring new ones.2006 is being hailed as the year of the customer. Whilst this may seem a rather fatuous statement, as the customer is always right and should have been central to all marketing in the past, it is intended to highlight the growing importance companies are placing on customer retention. Indeed, recent research confirms what has long been predicted that, for the first time since records began, a larger proportion of marketing budgets is now being spent on retaining existing customers than acquiring new ones.The report confirms that marketing to existing customers is now exceeding that to new customers. The exact figure quoted is that 53% of marketing budget is now being targeted at existing customers. If this is true, then ipso facto, the acquisition of customers is becoming less of a goal than the retention of them. Advertisement Tagged with: Individual giving Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img Marketers now spend more on retaining than acquiring customers  37 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Surrey Wildlife Trust chooses Access Dimensions for accounting

first_img Howard Lake | 5 September 2006 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  29 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Surrey Wildlife Trust chooses Access Dimensions for accountingcenter_img Access Dimensions has been developed by UK software author Access Accounting and is based on a Microsoft SQL Server database. Tagged with: Finance Technology The Surrey Wildlife Trust has selected Access Dimensions from Asyst Solutions for its accounting system. Devon and Kent Wildlife Trusts already use the software.The new system is designed to address a number of needs at the Surrey Wildlife Trust. Changes to the Statement of Recommended Practice (SORP) had affected the way that the Trust needed to present its annual reports, the Trust needed to consolidate different divisions into one system, and it needed to analyse income and expenditure across particular funding streams and events, often spanning multiple financial periods.Peter Lalor, head of finance for the Surrey Wildlife Trust, explained the Trust’s choice: “We needed more detailed reporting facilities than our previous system would allow, due mainly to the changing demands of charity law. Having spoken to other Trusts that use Access Dimensions, their positive feedback gave us the confidence to opt for this solution.” Advertisementlast_img read more

Barnardos to benefit from Clinton bash

first_imgBarnardos to benefit from Clinton bash Tagged with: Ireland  25 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 26 September 2006 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Barnardos Ireland will benefit from a high profile speaking engagement by former President Clinton in Dublin this week. Last year three Irish charities received part of the proceeds of a similar event in Dublin. President Clinton will speak on the theme of ‘Leadership for the Future’ at the Burlington Hotel. Limited Platinum tables are selling at ‚€10,000 (+vat) and Executive tables at ‚€7,500 (+vat). Barnardos have not disclosed how much they will make from the event but last year a figure of ‚€50,000 was reported. Advertisement About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

South African charity to target expats in the UK with blog

first_img Small South African charity Thusanani has started publishing a blog to communicate and inform the world about the plight of HIV/Aids orphans in South Africa. One of its main objectives is to target the large South African community settled in the UK and recruit them as donors.To date very few UK charities have embraced blogging as a way of establishing a dialogue with supporters and potential supporters, and the charity believes it is the first South African charity to do so.The blog will encourage both readers and users of Thusanani to voice their opinions and to allow others to learn from the charity’s experiences. “Thusanani” is an African word that means “helping each other”. Advertisement Fiona, Thusanani’s South African-based volunteer blog writer, explains how the blog can make a difference: “I am not an occupational therapist but I am a good writer and keen to get their message across to others. So I felt that I could help Thusanani as a volunteer and raise its profile through blogging.”Hayden Hamlet, trustee, said: “We are hoping that the large South African community in the UK will read the blog and give their support.”Unlike the USA, many UK charities have not taken up the opportunity to blog and thereby communicate to their donors, supporters, volunteers and the wider audience. Blogging allows Thusanani to converse openly, which involves being prepared to handle criticism, answer questions, and receive positive feedback.The world’s “Blogosphere” is now 60 times larger than it was 3 years ago, according to Technorati.com, and there are around 1.2 million legitimate postings a day. The blog-reading audience is about 20% of the size of the newspaper-reading population, according to the Pew Internet & American Life Project.  20 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis South African charity to target expats in the UK with blog Tagged with: Digitalcenter_img Howard Lake | 17 October 2006 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

Top business directors think charities are under-utilising their skills

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 4 January 2007 | News Top business directors think charities are under-utilising their skills  23 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Charities are struggling to use effectively the voluntary business skills of directors, according to a survey of the UK’s top directors by Directorbank in conjunction with Impetus Trust, a charity set up by the private equity industry.Five hundred of the 2,800 directors contacted responded to the survey, and many acknowledged that the problem was due largely to ‘hand to mouth’ funding, lack of project management capacity and the public perception that donations should go to a cause rather than on administration. More than half of the directors who responded volunteer as charity trustees so have some knowledge of the issues involved. Indeed, 62% of these say that a key motivation was to offer their specialist expertise. Despite their involvement, directors said that the biggest issues facing charities are financial management (24%), leadership (18%), business acumen (17%) and strategic direction (12%). Advertisementcenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Elizabeth Jackson, chief executive of Directorbank, argues that charities need to re-think how they use the business skills on offer.She said: “There is a strong sense of frustration among business leaders. They want to help charities but few feel they are making a real difference – which is a wasted opportunity for charities. Clearly there are a lot of issues about how directors can make more of a contribution, which needs addressing.”Over half of the directors surveyed (52%) stated an interest in offering their skills to venture philanthropy charity Impetus. The Trust only invests in charities that have a clear sense of ambition and distinctive strategy and can show how the investment will achieve “a significant step change”. Roger Flynn, director of SpringBoard Group and former director of BBC Ventures, is a founder director of Youth Culture Television. Even though he set up this charity, he has found it difficult to use his business skills in such a different environment. He admits that for all his experience and longer range ideas, board meetings often had to revolve around short term funding.One national charity that Directorbank says has made significant steps in using the skills of directors is Rathbone, which provides education and training for young people. Their chief executive, Richard Williams, has an education background and recruited specific business skills in both executive directors and trustees to complement his own skills. One of these, Barbara Rimmer, is former director of Focus Wickes Group and one of Directorbank’s candidates.Barbara Rimmer, director of finance at Rathbone, is using her expertise in corporate finance and change management to help the charity refocus and set clear goals. She said: We have agreed a three year strategy and given all directors and trustees specific targets to help us achieve our objectives.“Already this focus means we are seeing higher success rates in helping young people to achieve qualifications.” Tagged with: Management Research / statisticslast_img read more

iCoins launches free ebook on 7 Secrets to Facebook Fundraising

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Digital Facebook Online currency iCoins has published a free ebook “7 Secrets to Facebook Fundraising” which shares practical advice on how to use the social networking website to raise funds for a charity or nonprofit organisation.The book was written by social marketing strategist and coach Sara Waller.She commented: “Facebook fundraisers can learn how easy it is to raise funds safely, legally and quickly. They will learn how easy it is to build a database of prospective donors and how to keep those valued donors happy and encouraged to donate regularly.”www.facebookfundraisingtips.com Howard Lake | 6 October 2008 | News  30 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis iCoins launches free ebook on 7 Secrets to Facebook Fundraisinglast_img read more

A Guide to Grants for Individuals in Need 2009-2010 2009-2010

first_img Tagged with: Funding About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis A Guide to Grants for Individuals in Need 2009-2010 2009-2010center_img Howard Lake | 26 June 2009 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

Present Aid Unplugged

first_img Howard Lake | 19 November 2009 | News  37 total views,  1 views today Present Aid Unplugged About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: christmas Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  38 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Top UK solo percussionists, Dame Evelyn Glennie and Shovell from the band M People, have recorded a Present Aid Unplugged – a Christmas track with a difference.https://www.presentaid.org/page/presentaidunpluggedlast_img read more

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