University of Hartford student arrested for allegedly stabbing fellow classmates while ‘acting out’ movie scene

first_imgkali9/iStock(HARTFORD, Conn.) — A 21-year-old college student in Hartford, Conn., is facing attempted murder charges after police say he stabbed two fellow classmates while rehearsing a scene from a movie as a class assignment.University of Hartford student Jake Wascher was “acting out” a scene from a film when he allegedly began stabbing both victims at an on-campus apartment on Sunday afternoon, according to the Hartford Police Department.Wascher then fled the apartment on foot and surrendered to a patrol officer without incident about two hours later near a wooded area, several hundred yards southeast of the university’s main campus, police said.The two victims sustained serious stab wounds in their chests and backs, officials said. They were taken to a local hospital, where one was listed in serious but stable condition on Sunday. The other remained in critical condition in the hospital’s intensive care unit after undergoing surgery, police said.Wascher, of San Diego, California, was being held on $1 million bail on Sunday night. He was expected to be arraigned Monday in Hartford Superior Court on two counts each of first-degree assault and criminal attempt to commit murder. It’s unclear whether he has retained an attorney.University of Hartford spokesperson Mildred McNeill confirmed to ABC News that Wascher and the two victims are all students there.“Our thoughts are with these students and their families during this difficult time,” McNeill said in a statement. “While there is no ongoing threat to campus, we recognize that this isolated incident is frightening and unsettling. The university will provide counseling services to members of our campus community in need of support or assistance. The university will continue to work closely with the Hartford Police Department in their ongoing investigation.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.,kali9/iStock(HARTFORD, Conn.) — A 21-year-old college student in Hartford, Conn., is facing attempted murder charges after police say he stabbed two fellow classmates while rehearsing a scene from a movie as a class assignment.University of Hartford student Jake Wascher was “acting out” a scene from a film when he allegedly began stabbing both victims at an on-campus apartment on Sunday afternoon, according to the Hartford Police Department.Wascher then fled the apartment on foot and surrendered to a patrol officer without incident about two hours later near a wooded area, several hundred yards southeast of the university’s main campus, police said.The two victims sustained serious stab wounds in their chests and backs, officials said. They were taken to a local hospital, where one was listed in serious but stable condition on Sunday. The other remained in critical condition in the hospital’s intensive care unit after undergoing surgery, police said.Wascher, of San Diego, California, was being held on $1 million bail on Sunday night. He was expected to be arraigned Monday in Hartford Superior Court on two counts each of first-degree assault and criminal attempt to commit murder. It’s unclear whether he has retained an attorney.University of Hartford spokesperson Mildred McNeill confirmed to ABC News that Wascher and the two victims are all students there.“Our thoughts are with these students and their families during this difficult time,” McNeill said in a statement. “While there is no ongoing threat to campus, we recognize that this isolated incident is frightening and unsettling. The university will provide counseling services to members of our campus community in need of support or assistance. The university will continue to work closely with the Hartford Police Department in their ongoing investigation.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

‘Face mask exempt’ cards circulating online are fraudulent, says DOJ

first_imgDepartment of JusticeBy MARK HANRAHAN, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — Cards which were being offered for sale online purporting to exempt the bearer from ordinances requiring face coverings to be worn in public are fraudulent, according to Department of Justice officials. The cards, which for the moment are no longer available for purchase, say “wearing a face mask poses a mental and/or physical risk to me. Under the Americans with Disability [sic] act, I am not required to disclose my condition to you.” The card also carries a warning that violations of the Americans with Disabilities Act could be met with “steep penalties,” including fines of $75,000 or $150,000. The cards feature a Department of Justice logo and a logo incorporating a bald eagle for the group that produced them, the Freedom to Breathe Agency. The cards also warn: “Denying access to your business/organization will be also [be] reported to FTBA for further actions.”“Do not be fooled by the chicanery and misappropriation of the DOJ eagle,” U.S. Attorney Matthew G.T. Martin of the Middle District of North Carolina said in a statement. “These cards do not carry the force of law. The ‘Freedom to Breathe Agency,’ or ‘FTBA,’ is not a government agency.” FTBA’s Wix website and Facebook group page have been taken down. A new, private Facebook group was created last week, and now has over 400 members. The FTBA’s communications team said the cards were as “an educational tool” to help people “understand their legal and human rights so they can stand up to the unlawful, unscientific and unconstitutional mandates,” in an email to the New York Times. The group’s founder, Lenka Koloma, advertised versions of the cards which did not feature the Department of Justice logo on her personal Facebook page. Her post advertising the cards was flagged as false information by the social media giant’s fact checkers. Her personal website also features videos on how to deal with “face mask shaming.”ABC News has reached out to the FTBA for comment. Face masks have been a flashpoint for conflict during the coronavirus outbreak, with a string of violent encounters — including the murder of a store security guard — tied to confrontations over the coverings. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that people wear cloth face coverings in public settings, especially when other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain. Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

RMT strike vote after ‘sick’ driver seen playing squash

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. RMT strike vote after ‘sick’ driver seen playing squashOn 14 Oct 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. The RMT union has urged members to strike after a union activist was sackedfor playing squash while off on sick leave with an ankle injury. The driver was allegedly spotted playing the game “vigorously” byLondon Underground’s revenue protection team. The RMT will ballot its drivers on the Hammersmith and City Line of theLondon Underground (LU) in an attempt to reverse the decision, which they feelis backhanded and unacceptable. The union claims the LU employee was not given a chance and that he has producedevidence that his GP advised him that increased exercise would speed up hisrecovery. An LU spokesman said the man has been off work with this particular injurysince May, and has spent a total of 218 days off sick since he joined LU in1998. “We are disappointed the RMT has chosen to order a strike ballot whenthe disciplinary process is not yet exhausted,” he said. last_img read more

Can we predict the duration of an interglacial?

first_imgDifferences in the duration of interglacials have long been apparent in palaeoclimate records of the Late and Middle Pleistocene. However, a systematic evaluation of such differences has been hampered by the lack of a metric that can be applied consistently through time and by difficulties in separating the local from the global component in various proxies. This, in turn, means that a theoretical framework with predictive power for interglacial duration has remained elusive. Here we propose that the interval between the terminal oscillation of the bipolar seesaw and three thousand years (kyr) before its first major reactivation provides an estimate that approximates the length of the sea-level highstand, a measure of interglacial duration. We apply this concept to interglacials of the last 800 kyr by using a recently-constructed record of interhemispheric variability. The onset of interglacials occurs within 2 kyr of the boreal summer insolation maximum/precession minimum and is consistent with the canonical view of Milankovitch forcing pacing the broad timing of interglacials. Glacial inception always takes place when obliquity is decreasing and never after the obliquity minimum. The phasing of precession and obliquity appears to influence the persistence of interglacial conditions over one or two insolation peaks, leading to shorter (~ 13 kyr) and longer (~ 28 kyr) interglacials. Glacial inception occurs approximately 10 kyr after peak interglacial conditions in temperature and CO2, representing a characteristic timescale of interglacial decline. Second-order differences in duration may be a function of stochasticity in the climate system, or small variations in background climate state and the magnitude of feedbacks and mechanisms contributing to glacial inception, and as such, difficult to predict. On the other hand, the broad duration of an interglacial may be determined by the phasing of astronomical parameters and the history of insolation, rather than the instantaneous forcing strength at inception.last_img read more

Not all icequakes are created equal: basal icequakes suggest diverse bed deformation mechanisms at Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica

first_imgMicroseismicity, induced by the sliding of a glacier over its bed, can be used to characterize frictional properties of the ice‐bed interface, which are a key parameter controlling ice stream flow. We use naturally occurring seismicity to monitor spatiotemporally varying bed properties at Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica. We locate 230000 micro‐earthquakes with local magnitudes from –2.0 to –0.3 using 90 days of recordings from a 35‐station seismic network located ∼40 km upstream of the grounding line. Events exclusively occur near the ice‐bed interface and indicate predominantly flow‐parallel stick‐slip. They mostly lie within a region of interpreted stiff till and along the likely stiffer part of mega‐scale glacial landforms. Within these regions, micro‐earthquakes occur in spatially (<100 m radius) and temporally (mostly 1‐5 days activity) restricted event‐clusters (up to 4000 events), which exhibit an increase, followed by a decrease, in event magnitude with time. This may indicate event triggering once activity is initiated. Although ocean tides modulate the surface ice flow velocity, we observe little periodic variation in overall event frequency over time and conclude that water content, bed topography and stiffness are the major factors controlling microseismicity. Based on variable rupture mechanisms and spatiotemporal characteristics, we suggest the event‐clusters relate to three end‐member types of bed deformation: (1) continuous creation and seismogenic destruction of small‐scale bed‐roughness, (2) ploughed clasts and (3) flow‐oblique deformation during landform‐formation or along bedrock outcrops. This indicates that multiple processes, simultaneously active during glacial sliding, can accommodate stick‐slip behaviour and that the bed continuously reorganizes.last_img read more

Justices Remand Bloomington Property Partition Dispute

first_imgJustices Remand Bloomington Property Partition DisputeOlivia Covington for www.theindianalawyer.comA woman’s case to partition and sell a Bloomington property will continue after the Indiana Supreme Court reversed a lower court’s finding that the husband and wife with whom the woman purchased the property were not tenants by the entireties of the property.In 2002, a warranty deed on a Bloomington property near the Indiana University campus was granted to Cheryl Underwood, Kenneth Kinney and his wife, Judith Fulford.  The granting clause of the deed held that the three were granted the warranty “all as Tenants-in-Common.”Twelve years later in 2014, a damages judgment was entered against Kinney and Underwood and in favor of Sheree Demming, Underwood’s former employer, becoming a lien on the property. Kinney died the same year, and in 2015 Underwood filed the present action asking the court to partition and sell the property and distribute its proceeds.Thomas Bunger, personal representative of Kinney’s estate, moved to dismiss Underwood’s petition under Trial Rule 12(B)(6), arguing that the estate no longer had an interest in the property. Further, Demming moved for summary judgment, similarly arguing that the estate had no interest in the property and that she had a valid, enforceable lien against Underwood’s interest.The Monroe Circuit Court granted both motions, finding that the deed clearly and unambiguously created “an estate by the entireties as to the interest of” Kinney and Fulford. The Indiana Court of Appeals affirmedthose decisions on appeal nearly one year ago.The Indiana Supreme Court, however, reversed the trial court’s decision in a unanimous Monday opinion. Writing for the court, Justice Geoffrey Slaughter first noted that the granting clause in the warranty deed defeats the presumption that a conveyance of real property to spouses creates an estate by their entireties “by expressing an intention to create a tenancy in common among all three grantees – Underwood, Husband, and Wife.”In 2002, the same year the warranty deed was granted, the Indiana Legislature reaffirmed the common-law presumption that spouses are tenants by their entireties, but reduced the showing required to overcome that presumption in Indiana Code Section 32-17-3-1(d) by holding that, “If: a contract expressly creates a tenancy in common; or it appears from the tenor of a contract that the contract was intended to create a tenancy in common; the contract shall be construed to create a tenancy in common.”The deed’s granting clause included the phrase “all as Tenants-in-Common,” Slaughter said, and the use of the word “all” signifies that the grantor “did not view Husband and Wife as one entity whose unitary estate in the Property was by the entireties.”“Were that his intention, the Deed would have described two sets of grantees – Underwood and Husband/Wife – and said they were acquiring their interests ‘both as Tenants-in-Common,’” the justice wrote. “We hold that the phrase actually used – ‘all as Tenants-in-Common’ – refers to more than two such tenants and denotes that ‘all’ three grantees take hold as tenants in common.”Thus, the trial court’s contrary judgment in Cheryl L. Underwood v. Thomas Bunger, in his capacity as the personal representative of the Estate of Kenneth K. Kinney; Judith M. Fulford; and Sheree Demming, 53S01-1703-MI-126, was reversed and the case was remanded for further proceedings.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

Michigan City council members pass resolution of no confidence in Mayor Duane Parry

first_img Pinterest Facebook Previous articleWoman killed, male passenger injured in drive-by shooting at Eddy & Jefferson in South BendNext articleCity of South Bend offering program to help businesses with online presence Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+ Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Michigan City council members pass resolution of no confidence in Mayor Duane Parry Twitter Google+ By Jon Zimney – March 17, 2021 1 109 (Photo supplied) The Michigan City City Council has approved a resolution of no confidence in Mayor Duane Parry.The resolution passed, this week, demands that Parry resign after he made a racial remark on a voicemail message to a local black pastor after he thought he had hung up his phone.Parry said he will not resign but did apologize, last week, for his remark.He said he and his staff and all city workers will undergo implicit bias cultural training. IndianaLocalNews Twitter WhatsApplast_img read more

Shining a light on bicycle safety in Boston

first_img“Picture a bridge over a river with a hole in the middle,” said Dahianna Lopez, a Ph.D. student in health policy at Harvard. “When people cross it, some are going to fall through the hole and into the water below. There will be people on the river bank who will jump in and pull them out one by one — those are the doctors. But the public health professionals will ask, ‘Hold on a second, why is there a hole in the bridge? How many people are falling through? How can we fix it?’”Lopez is asking similar questions in her own research, as she works to shine a light on the factors that make it more likely for cyclists and pedestrians to be involved in a crash on the streets of Boston. She is earning her doctoral degree in health policy, with a concentration in evaluative science and statistics, through a University-wide interdisciplinary program offered through Harvard School of Public Health and five other Schools, and expects to graduate in 2016. She has received financial support for her work from the Boston Area Research Initiative at the Radcliffe Institute and the Rappaport Institute at the Kennedy School.For the past year, Lopez has worked with Boston’s Police Department, Department of Transportation, and Mayor’s Office on an assessment of bicyclist injuries in the city. Read Full Storylast_img read more

Senate filibuster fight cools for now, but battles ahead

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is moving forward with a power-sharing agreement in the evenly-split chamber after Republican leader Mitch McConnell backed off his demand that Senate Democrats preserve the procedural tool known as the filibuster. The stand-off between McConnell and new Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer had all but ground the Senate to a halt in the early days of the Democratic majority and threatened President Joe Biden’s agenda. Schumer refused to meet McConnell’s demands. But the debate over the filibuster is far from over. McConnell warned Tuesday of all the ways the Senate business could still be tied in knots if Democrats try to press on with plans to pursue changes to the filibuster.last_img read more

Costa Rican Coast Guard Chief Hails Effectiveness of Operation MARTILLO

first_imgDuring one successful Operation MARTILLO mission on April 29, law enforcement authorities, with the support of P-3 aircraft, interdicted a 30-foot, 250-horsepower go-fast boat which was carrying more than half a ton of cocaine. SNG personnel aboard three vessels deployed by Costa Rica’s police maritime security force intercepted the go-fast boat — which had no license number or name — off the Pacific coast, some 84 nautical miles southwest of the city of Quepos, one of the country’s major tourist resorts. There, SNG agents found 591 kilos of cocaine packed in 23 bags, and arrested the vessel’s three crew members, two Ecuadoreans and one Costa Rican national. Law enforcement authorities suspect the boat was from Ecuador. SNG agents interdict narco-boats The success of Operation MARTILLO The use of P-3 aircraft also enhances communications, he added, because “our vessels, our operators talk with the P3,” and the P3 communicates that information to authorities. During those efforts, military authorities in Operation MARTILLO remain on the lookout for new trends – such as the increasing number of Ecuadorean narco-ships in the region. These are typically small go-fast boats, which are difficult to spot. Most of them leave Ecuadorean port installations on the Pacific Ocean, go past that South American nation’s Galapagos Islands, and continue by Costa Rica’s Cocos Island. Drug traffickers often offload cocaine in Costa Rica for storage, and later attempt to ship the narcotics to Guatemala, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. Their boats, meanwhile, can be supported by as many as 21 other vessels providing logistical support, such as fuel and ammunition. The initiative has proven successful in interdicting drugs in the region, and a key component in that effort has been the use of Orion P3 patrol airplanes by U.S. Coast Guard personnel. These aircraft have sophisticated equipment that helps law enforcement officers detect and capture go-fast boats and fishing vessels that drug traffickers use to transport drugs, Col. Arias told Diálogo. The head of Costa Rica’s National Coast Guard Service (SNG), Colonel Martín Arias, is an enthusiastic supporter of Operation MARTILLO – a multinational initiative against drug trafficking along Central American coastal waters. SNG agents interdict narco-boats By Dialogo May 26, 2015 Such capabilities have helped law enforcement authorities achieve a high rate of success in stopping narco-boats that attempt to transport drugs from Ecuador and Colombia north to Honduras and Guatemala. Since Military authorities launched Operation MARTILLO in January 2012, the initiative has resulted in the seizure of about 400 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $8 billion. “If we, as countries, don’t coordinate … the winners are the drug traffickers,” Col. Arias said. “So, working in regional blocs, results are bigger, and we’re going to see more numerous results in the months to come, in the years to come.” “They’re Ecuadorean vessels, with Ecuadorean licenses, but usually operated by Colombians,” Col. Arias said. “It’s a mode we’ve been finding for almost a year.” During one successful Operation MARTILLO mission on April 29, law enforcement authorities, with the support of P-3 aircraft, interdicted a 30-foot, 250-horsepower go-fast boat which was carrying more than half a ton of cocaine. SNG personnel aboard three vessels deployed by Costa Rica’s police maritime security force intercepted the go-fast boat — which had no license number or name — off the Pacific coast, some 84 nautical miles southwest of the city of Quepos, one of the country’s major tourist resorts. There, SNG agents found 591 kilos of cocaine packed in 23 bags, and arrested the vessel’s three crew members, two Ecuadoreans and one Costa Rican national. Law enforcement authorities suspect the boat was from Ecuador. On the same day, agents on one of the SNG vessels also interdicted a nearby boat, the “Pura Vida,” with the support of personnel on another P-3 aircraft who spotted the suspicious boat. In addition to arresting the two crew members, the law enforcement officers found 24 fuel drums, a handgun, a GPS device, a satellite telephone, and two cell phones on the boat. The two countries have cooperated in the fight against drug trafficking for years. For example, in 1999, Costa Rica and the U.S. signed a joint patrol agreement calling for the Coast Guards of both countries to work together in Costa Rican and international waters in the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Such capabilities have helped law enforcement authorities achieve a high rate of success in stopping narco-boats that attempt to transport drugs from Ecuador and Colombia north to Honduras and Guatemala. Since Military authorities launched Operation MARTILLO in January 2012, the initiative has resulted in the seizure of about 400 tons of cocaine, worth an estimated $8 billion. The importance of cooperation These are typically small go-fast boats, which are difficult to spot. Most of them leave Ecuadorean port installations on the Pacific Ocean, go past that South American nation’s Galapagos Islands, and continue by Costa Rica’s Cocos Island. Drug traffickers often offload cocaine in Costa Rica for storage, and later attempt to ship the narcotics to Guatemala, Mexico, the United States, and Europe. Their boats, meanwhile, can be supported by as many as 21 other vessels providing logistical support, such as fuel and ammunition. To combat sophisticated drug trafficking organizations, Costa Rica works in cooperation with various U.S. security forces, often through the former’s local Drug Enforcement Police and the Intelligence and National Security Bureau. Costa Rica also works closely with the security forces of neighboring countries, such as Colombia, Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras. During those efforts, military authorities in Operation MARTILLO remain on the lookout for new trends – such as the increasing number of Ecuadorean narco-ships in the region. “They’re Ecuadorean vessels, with Ecuadorean licenses, but usually operated by Colombians,” Col. Arias said. “It’s a mode we’ve been finding for almost a year.” The importance of cooperation The head of Costa Rica’s National Coast Guard Service (SNG), Colonel Martín Arias, is an enthusiastic supporter of Operation MARTILLO – a multinational initiative against drug trafficking along Central American coastal waters. To combat sophisticated drug trafficking organizations, Costa Rica works in cooperation with various U.S. security forces, often through the former’s local Drug Enforcement Police and the Intelligence and National Security Bureau. P3 patrol airplanes are crucial in Operation MARTILLO’s continuing efforts to fight such narco-trafficking. On the same day, agents on one of the SNG vessels also interdicted a nearby boat, the “Pura Vida,” with the support of personnel on another P-3 aircraft who spotted the suspicious boat. In addition to arresting the two crew members, the law enforcement officers found 24 fuel drums, a handgun, a GPS device, a satellite telephone, and two cell phones on the boat. The initiative has proven successful in interdicting drugs in the region, and a key component in that effort has been the use of Orion P3 patrol airplanes by U.S. Coast Guard personnel. These aircraft have sophisticated equipment that helps law enforcement officers detect and capture go-fast boats and fishing vessels that drug traffickers use to transport drugs, Col. Arias told Diálogo. Since January 1, the SNG has interdicted nine go-fast boats and three fishing boats, which were allegedly carrying more than 3.9 tons of cocaine; in total it has carried out 25 maritime interdictions, seizing more than 15.3 tons of cocaine, according to the Public Security Ministry. The use of P-3 aircraft also enhances communications, he added, because “our vessels, our operators talk with the P3,” and the P3 communicates that information to authorities. Since January 1, the SNG has interdicted nine go-fast boats and three fishing boats, which were allegedly carrying more than 3.9 tons of cocaine; in total it has carried out 25 maritime interdictions, seizing more than 15.3 tons of cocaine, according to the Public Security Ministry. The success of Operation MARTILLO P3 patrol airplanes are crucial in Operation MARTILLO’s continuing efforts to fight such narco-trafficking. “For an operation to be successful, really successful … support from the air –with the P3 airplanes – is extremely important, because the sea is vast, weather conditions – in general – are adverse, so it helps you intervene and reach targets more precisely,” Col. Arias said. “With a P3 plane, the probability of a vessel carrying narcotics, the possibility of capture, is 90 percent,” but “without a P3, it drops … to 10 percent.” The two countries have cooperated in the fight against drug trafficking for years. For example, in 1999, Costa Rica and the U.S. signed a joint patrol agreement calling for the Coast Guards of both countries to work together in Costa Rican and international waters in the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Authorities spot new trends on drug routes Costa Rica also works closely with the security forces of neighboring countries, such as Colombia, Panama, Nicaragua, and Honduras. Authorities spot new trends on drug routes “For an operation to be successful, really successful … support from the air –with the P3 airplanes – is extremely important, because the sea is vast, weather conditions – in general – are adverse, so it helps you intervene and reach targets more precisely,” Col. Arias said. “With a P3 plane, the probability of a vessel carrying narcotics, the possibility of capture, is 90 percent,” but “without a P3, it drops … to 10 percent.” “If we, as countries, don’t coordinate … the winners are the drug traffickers,” Col. Arias said. “So, working in regional blocs, results are bigger, and we’re going to see more numerous results in the months to come, in the years to come.”last_img read more

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